Sunday, 19 July 2009

Smile For The Camera!


"Smile for the camera" takes on a new meaning, as one Japanese railway company is requiring employees to check electronically their smiles ahead of work.

As much as I appreciate people smiling at me, this is a bit much. Whatever next?

19 comments:

  1. Haha...mechanizing workers? :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Heard about the news in tv. Well the machine did say to smile sincerely from the heart, so I did think for a while it wasn't such a bast**d for forcing people to smile. But I still don't like the fact that people are forced to be sincere. :P

    ReplyDelete
  3. @Mei Teng,
    robots with a heart?

    @Jim,
    I don't like it too.

    Compared to the Komuter/LRT staff here in Malaysia, the JR staff in Japan are so much better already.

    ReplyDelete
  4. That's one of the lines I use. I haven't really noticed any particular issues in the facial expression department, in fact I'd be happy to swap a bit of smileyness for more frequent off-peak services to the station I normally use.

    ReplyDelete
  5. @Penguin,
    This is your line?

    Well, Japan off peak service would be much frequent compared elsewhere like my country where the Komuter train service on peak period is at 20 minutes interval! Frequent service & smiling staff would make commuting each day a little bit easier, I guess. No? :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Yes..but the employers have no heart trying to force employees to smile. Working is tough already...and having to put on a smile when one doesn't feel like it.

    ReplyDelete
  7. A former colleague of mine didn't quite like his trip to Tokyo a couple of years back. He found the service, though excellent, lacks the warmth.

    Do you agree?

    ReplyDelete
  8. @Mei Teng,
    I know... Sure hard to muster a smile when you are not feeling it.

    @C K,
    In a way, yes. But mostly in the cities, maybe due to the huge crowd they see daily? When we got "lost" in the countryside, the staff there were genuinely kind to us and helped us find our way around.

    But then I noticed that, while the staff were polite and all, the commuters just tend to ignore them. I felt guilty not smiling back or bowing back even though I've been told it's OK not to do so.

    ReplyDelete
  9. This sounds like a great idea! I bet it will work well.

    ReplyDelete
  10. If employees weren’t happy enough to smile b4, I suppose this new procedure will make them any happier throughout the day!

    ReplyDelete
  11. @Life Ramblings,
    Positive image (smiling, etc) = positive working attitude?
    I do think that the JR staff were "perky" enough to deal with customers.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Lina!

    I'd rather have a warm smile than an empty smile =P

    ReplyDelete
  13. @Ayie,
    Evening to you? :)

    But then, an empty smile may be better than a scowl? :D
    But yes, I rather have a warm smile too...

    ReplyDelete
  14. A smile is best when come out from a heart.
    As pure as a baby when they smile at you :)

    Thanks for dropping by Lina :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. @VanillaSeven,
    That's deep.

    No problem. Thanks for reciprocating to. :)

    ReplyDelete
  16. I think this is ridiculous! But it does make you practise smiling though, which is a good thing : )

    ReplyDelete
  17. Meh pointless. From the little I have seen Japanese people are already the champions of faking smiles lol..

    ReplyDelete
  18. @foong,
    I guess. But do one really need to practise smiling (or laughing?) Only in Japan...

    @Prometheus,
    Ain't that the truth. :D
    Japanese people are way too chirpy sometimes, it's unnatural.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Helo frend, nice post, can we do link exchange ? This my web : Internet and Computer Technology | www.idonbiu.com

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...