Thursday, 12 November 2009

To Tetsudō Hakubutsukan (Railway Museum)


The Tetsudō Hakubutsukan or the Railway Museum is definitely a must visit for anyone interested in the trains and railways. We went to the now closed Transportation Museum a few years back and enjoyed looking at all the train exhibits there, so we were really looking forward to a visit to this Railway Museum.

The Railway Museum was built in Onari, Saitama City as the centerpiece of the JR East 20th Anniversary Memorial Project.
Paying our entrance fees using our Suica and Passmo cards. We also used our cards as our entry passes. So easy, convenient and avoiding wastage in issuing new cards or passes. Entrance fee was 1,000yen for adult, 500yen for Elementary, Junior High and High School Students and 200yen for children 3 years and above.
The centrepiece of the exhibition. 35 real train cars, including the six-car Imperial train form the primary exhibit. Almost all the trains exhibited there can be entered, so you get a feeling of taking all those trains. A truly exciting day for train nuts like us. You can bet we went looking at every single train on exhibit. On the first floor, you can learn a little bit of history of how the train evolve in Japan. Do note that while there are labels of the exhibits in English, none of the explanation were. But don't let that mar you from enjoying going through an important part (I feel) of Japan history here.

More photos of us enjoying our visit there next.

13 comments:

  1. Weee! So train truly is your passion. You should really have a train room in the house, that's cool since you have a little boy with you.

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  2. there are many good train models and toys here most esp whenever i go to the craft shop

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  3. The evolution of trains... look at how much train changes in Japan.

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  4. @Ayie,
    Yeap, You're first! :-)

    I know. The train model sets that we have at home are just kept in their boxes. Well, maybe we need to upgrade our home first before thinking of putting up a train room!

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  5. @ladyviral,
    Japan really invested a lot to have a train system like it is now.

    And maybe there's hope for our own public transportation, hoping that someday it'll evolve to be a semblance of an efficient system.

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  6. Harris mesti suke museum ni. Dia dah ada tanda2 jadik Desya Mania ni!

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  7. Wah! Didn't know you are a train freak! Haha! But this is such a cool place to learn about the history of trains in Japan!

    Some more can enter all the trains as if for real!

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  8. Btw, congrats for being FC on my blog. Finally, eh? : )

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  9. @Farah,
    I bet he'll have oodles of fun there. Byk benda interactive for kids to experience there. ;)

    Zaini & Raimie, bukan takat suka trains. Suka turun naik stesen, dengar tunes keretapi also. Even the "Beppu, Beppu" annoucement. That crack Raimie up every time he remembered it. LOL

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  10. @foong,
    Zaini is more train crazy than me. :D

    Yeah, finally got the chance to be FC at your blog. So susah one!

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  11. I know children would love this...especially those pretty little choo choo trains.

    How come M'sia cannot turn the now abandoned railway station into a museum?

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  12. @Mei Teng,
    And indeed there were many parents coming with their small children to the museum, and having a great time there!

    I guess we in Malaysia doesn't believe in educating the next generation and preserving a part of our history. I don't know...

    But then again, going to museums in Malaysia isn't as fun as those overseas. You agree?

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