Tuesday, 15 March 2011

Godaido Island Temple

Godaido is a Buddhist wooden worship hall located on a small island named Godaidojima, just next to Matsushima Pier in Miyagi Prefecture. The worship hall was founded by Jikaku Daishi in 807 and was  later reconstructed by lord Date Masamune in 1609.
This temple is the oldest Momoyama-style architecture in the Tohoku region and has been designated as an important cultural asset. The ceiling within this hall is decorated with the twelve animals of the Chinese zodiac. The statues of the five great Myoo (Daseifudomyoo, Tohogozanze, Seihodaiitoku, Nanpokundari, and Hoppokongoyasha) or five wisdom kings of Buddhism are enshrined in this temple and are put on public display only once every 33 years. It last opened in 2006, so we have to wait another 20+ years to view the statues.
The red lacquered Sukashibashi. Careful and don't slip between the planks!
A lone omikuji

I wonder how this temple fare in the aftermath of Friday's earthquake? But if I learn anything about Japan's history, the Japanese would not dwell much on it and just dust themselves up and start rebuilding their lives again. And that's the spirit!

I found a photo showing the temple still standing, so check out Meshikui3's photo here.

18 comments:

  1. The surrounding of the temple looks beautiful. I hope not too much damage was inflicted by the earthquake.
    And I agree with what you say about what spirit means for Japanese. I'm sure they will rise above the current difficult time.
    Praying and hoping the best for them.

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  2. This is very true, especially if you believe in Hinduism.
    Everything that's alive must be destroyed so new life can be created.
    That's why Hindu people worship Shiva.

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  3. @Con Artist Trickster,
    Matsushima, where Godaido Temple is located is considered one of Japan's most scenic view.

    A prayer and also a helping hand for those affected are always appreciated, don't you agree?

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  4. @London Caller,
    And for us Muslims, we believe that we are tested so that we may come to know the reality of ourselves and others.

    This can be viewed as a test for those who believe.

    God knows best.

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  5. Its very beautiful, pristine and peaceful. I wonder how the old architectures are after the earthquake and the tsunami disaster hit the country. I once watched a documentary about it and how the ancestors built them so well.
    I agree with what you say about how we Muslims are tested so that we may come to know the reality of ourselves and others. Thats the best way of putting it. I would say more but I will not because afraid I might hit someone's sensitive button about religion :-)

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  6. @cuteandcurls,
    Yeah, I would've said more too, but I do not want to impose my believe and religion here. I'm just stating one small example there.

    Every religion has a belief about man's ability to wither any tests in life. Unless maybe not for a cult or something that promote keeling over and wait for miracle to come whenever adversities come their way. o.O

    The temple may look peaceful, but actually when we were there, it was packed with tourists! People are everywhere on that small island, you can't find a place to take a breather there. XD

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  7. This is such a beautiful place and like the red lacquered bridge. I am glad to hear it is still standing, but I wasn't sure which photo on the blog you saw it in.

    Thank you for pointing out Meshikui3's blog. You can see there were food and happy photos before the earthquake/tsunami. It goes to show that it just takes moments to change people's lives.

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  8. Lina, these pictures are beautiful. I can imagine seeing the beauty in person. You must be glad you have been there and to have the beauty documented. From the picture in your link, the place will take some time and lots of care to put it back to its former glory and pristine condition.

    What the people of Japan are going thru is truly heart-wrenching. You are right about their strong spirit. May their recovery be smooth and speedy.

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  9. @AVCr8teur,
    You see that small hill in the photo? That's Godaido Island and the roof seen amidst the trees is the temple.

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  10. @HappySurfer,
    Let's hope the struggle back to normal lives happen soon for the poor people affected by this tragedy.

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  11. We definitely could learn a lesson from the people of Japan and how they are handling themselves. What they are going through now is too difficult to imagine. good thing that the temple is still standing.

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  12. Beautiful looking old temple and love the surrounds.

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  13. @LR,
    Yes, good to know the temple is still standing. I hear that a nearby Zuiganji Temple suffered a bit of damage.

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  14. @Japan Australia,
    It is a beautiful little temple, isn't it? :)

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  15. Yes, a very beautiful temple!

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  16. @Sarah,
    A beautiful temple and I'm glad to know its still standing. ^^

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  17. I am so happy to know it's still standing! :-)
    Thank you Lina!

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  18. @Anna,
    I was glad too. Let's see if I'm still around come 2039, when the five great Myoo are displayed for the public again. :)

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