Monday, 13 February 2012

Oke?

A post inspired by Rurousha's very interesting snippet about one particular rat-like boy(?) which is one of the many colourful statues that one can find in the street near Sensoji in Asakusa. Also, if you want to know the meaning of the word on the title, you'd have to read the comment section of  Rurousha's Rat Boy post! Go on. Go over and read. I bet you'll get hooked visiting her awesome blog. It's better than reading a history book! I promise! By the way, I forgot to mention that I love my history books. Give me history books and I'll devour it. Shouldn't be surprised that it was one of very few subject sI actually paid attention to in class. ^^

Anyways, in my rather "demanding" but going about it in a roundabout'ish way, I'm putting up a few photos of similar statues I found while walking around the street of Asakusa and hoping that Rurousha or other learned soul in or out of Japan can shed some lights on their story. 
 Another rat boy? Whatcha scaling the wall for, mister?
 A bloke fending off rat boy? Halt! Or I swipe your head with my umbrella.
Some blokes (and a bird) I don't mind chatting up. Pretty fit and energetic bunch of people, with excellent knowledge of the area. They are waiting for visitors to get on their jinrikisha (human-powered car). A fellow blogger, Kak Lela who resides in Okinawa commented that the rikisha guys (and gals) are university under-grads. They are athletes and strong runners. Oooooo.....
Rikisha guys in action. I did stop and eavesdropped but since my Japanese is negligible - can't understand a word they were saying. I would love to sit in the rickshaw someday- not only can I learn of the area more intimately but also a chance to ogle at hot butts! LOL
this one, a particularly blurry photo I took of Raimie waaayy back in 2006. The rikisha "oke" obligingly stopped when he saw me taking photos. I snapped a bad one but I felt guilty halting him and his customers.

Can't send chocolates to Rurousha to celebrate Valentine's Day so I hope this post dedicated to her would suffice. You gals in Japan - giving out a lot of chocolates come Valentine's Day tomorrow?

Anyways, chocolates to us ladies is encouraged. But chocolates to men from ladies is just not normal! Not for me anyway. I sure ain't gonna give guys chocolates because I should be the one getting them!

Update. Another one! ^^

Rurousha, the kind soul that she is, had gone back to scout/dig/unearth more info about the statues and you can read all about them (plus watch a clip too) over at her post titled "The Five Scoundrels on Asakusa Roofs".

56 comments:

  1. I love her blog too! I think those rat boy things are really weird.

    Its my idea of hell to pull a rickshaw and have to run, but I suppose in the olden days people had to do it all the time and over much worse roads too - help!

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    1. Her blog is awesome, right? :) I am pretty happy that she now update hers regularly so that I always have something new (and interesting) to read every day. ^^

      Yeah, it was much worse in olden times. Thank goodness we have motor-powered vehicles now!

      But anyway, in Malaysia - rickshaws or beca in Malay can still be seen around, not only for tourists but also as a mode o transport for locals. You can see them transporting locals a lot in Kuala Terengganu. And there are many of them, waiting to cycle tourists around in Penang and Malacca. ^^

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  2. Thanks for all the nice compliments! Not to mention the sexy legs! Way better than chocolate!

    I think that first oke is maybe climbing down after visiting a nubile maiden for a bit of canoodling. Well, that's my theory, anyway. ^^ I don't know the story behind all the other statues yet, but I now feel morally obliged to find out. It will definitely require a rikisha ride!

    PS: Raimie is adorable at all ages! :)

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    1. That's a good theory. But do they do that kind of thing in strait-laced Japan? ;p

      Though there is that tradition in China where on certain days,men climbed over his girl's room. I forgot which part of China and what the occasion is. Must do some gooling soon!

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    2. You've never heard of yobai? Yobai ("night crawling") was an old custom: a man entered a woman's room at night, crawled into her bed and - provided she consented - had his wicked way with her. If I understand correctly, this "sneak attack" was often pre-arranged! It sounds a bit like the Chinese custom.

      So I think that guy is clambering down after a bit of yobai-ing. ;)

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    3. Yea, definitely sounds like that Chinese customs. Though, are these pre-arranged attacks resulted in marriages afterwards?

      Interesting. I need to learn more about 'yobai'. ;) The same customs also was "exercised" (for lack of better word) in some ethnic groups in Borneo if I'm not mistaken.

      Shows that folk back in the days know how to have "fun" too! xD

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    4. I'm not sure about yobai and marriage. Further research is definitely required.

      Oh they knew about fun! They knew enough to produce 127 million offspring! :D

      PS: Nobody has identified the statues yet. Yeee-ha! Now I'll have to go on that rikisha ride!

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    5. I was hoping Minor would know and able to share some insight.

      Be nice and don't scare those blokes, when you get on that rikisha ride. Or I'm telling the Hero! LOL

      Have fun. I'm jealous.

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    6. I was hoping Minor or Cocomino might know.

      OK, I'll be nice. Look but don't touch. :D

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  3. Me again. I gave a startled snort/chortle/giggle when I saw the title of this post. South African English is turning into a global power! :-p

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    1. We should always "promote" interesting languages. Learning new languages is a great way to learn about the country and their culture too. And I am ashamed to say, I don't know much about South Africa! :(

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    2. p.s. I find the sound of Afrikaans so interesting but I am avoiding putting my two cents at that particular post due to the high-brow and very intellectual comments there.

      As you probably noticed, I am neither. xD

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    3. p.s.p.s
      Did you notice "our beloved" Sky Tree in the background of the 1st photo? ^^

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    4. I don't know much about Malaysia, but I'm learning! ^^

      I demand (heh, I'm following my blogging role model's example again) that you say something about Malay's raindrop sounds in that language post! If an African savage can do it, so can a jungle lady from Malay! ^^

      Yes, I noticed Sky Tree! Look, they hadn't even started working on the second observation pod yet! That was about, hmmm, 18 months ago? Longer? Shorter?

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    5. Jungle lady from Malaysia (used to be called Malaya or in our language "Tanah Melayu" trans: Land of Malay people) have inferior complex issues when is confronted with all things intellectual.LOL

      Sky Tree - taken in Sep 2010. You are spot on about the time! Wow!

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    6. Yes but Malay contributed to Afrikaans, and the Malay descendants in Cape Town form a big Afrikaans community, so you should take part lah!(^0^)

      How do I say in Malay "don't be silly"?! :D

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    7. You don't like intellectual stuff but you love history books? Muekeke! Or should that be wakaka? :D

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    8. Well... history books for me is akin to reading story books. Downright riveting. The only problem about reading up history is that all events are real and not make believe.

      Don't be silly, you ask? How did the Hero say it in Afrikaans? I think you mentioned it once in your post, right? But in Malay? Let's see
      1. Merepek (nonsense)
      2. Jangan jadi bodoh (don't be stupid, actually)
      3. Or in the context of people giving excuse, you can say "Ada-ada saja"

      ;)

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    9. Terima kasih! All that is going straight into my Malay file. ^^

      The Hero says "moenie stupid wees nie". That's a mixed Afr/Eng expression that means "don't be stupid". Sometimes he adds "ii kara" which roughly means "enough already". :D

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    10. Three different languages in one sentence. Respect!

      Though I think Malaysians may have that tendency too. Jumbling English, Chinese, Tamil and Malay in one conversation. LOL

      What's the difference in saying "enough already" between "mou ii" and "ii kara"?

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    11. I'm so not a Japanese expert, but ... you can also use the full expression "mō ii kara", i.e. "that's enough" or "stop it now" or "let it go" or "forget it". I think "ii kara" is a bit ruder or at least more irritable.

      He throws German into the mix at times, but these days I'm fighting back by peppering my responses with bladibarskets! :D

      Since I've encountered a certain demanding Malaysian, I've started reading more about your languages. It's a delightful jungle jumble! ^^ Love it.

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    12. Sit in a car with a Malaysian driver and you'll learn more (a lot more) than that blardibasket. You can learn curses in several languages too! xD

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  4. Nothing wrong with just looking!

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  5. Some interesting pictures there! I'd love to hear more about those new rat boys and their stories :)

    Japan Australia

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    1. Me too. :)

      But I hope the others are not rat boys. I am hoping the rest are interesting characters that used to live in the area. :)

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  6. There are two rickshaw groups in Asakusa. Jidaiya is only in Asakusa. Ebisuya is all over Japan.
    Wedding parade by rickshaw is possible only by Jidaiya.
    There are a few rickshawa people who can speak English.
    Next time,please ask wether there are English speaking rickshawa people or not.
    But the fee is very expensive, please check the price.

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    1. Interesting facts. Thanks for sharing about the rickshaw groups,Minor.

      But do you about those statues seen on buildings nearby Sensoji/Nakamise? They sure are interesting, more so if they are of real-life characters. :)

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  7. Adding to about richshaw, you can enjoy shutter paintings in Nakamise.
    http://www.asakusa-nakamise.jp/seasons-e.html
    Have a nice day!

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    1. Thanks!

      I think I have some photos of the shutters in my collection too! :)

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  8. I wish I could see them in person next time I visit Japan! @0@

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    1. You will definitely see them if you visit Asakusa.

      The rikisha guys are easily seen in front of the Kaminarimon Gate. And the statues, just walk away from Nakamise-dori and towards the Sumida river; you'll find those interesting statues. ^^

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  9. I know one of them is on the roof of old kimono shop. I have been guiding for foreigners more than 7 years.

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    1. But why are the statues put up there, Minor?

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  10. There is also Rikisha in Kawagoe. It's good if you will ride on it someday. :D

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  11. >But chocolates to men from ladies is just not normal!

    Fair play mah!
    Men give women chocolates to make them fat.
    Women must also revenge one lah! Kakaka

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    1. Chocolate for revenge?

      That would be a waste of good chocolate! xD

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    2. Chocolate war lah!
      Can also stimulate our economy.
      If only men buy chocolates, chocolate shops will go bankrupt, right.

      But Malaysian chocolates not very fine, bit too coarse. Ha.
      Now I like Swiss chocolates, very fine and smooth. Maybe it's the Swiss cows? No?

      >This used to be a usual sight in my kampung. Now, kampung become bandar already. Monkeys went and had to do their business elsewhere.

      Raub cannot be so canggih, right? ;0)
      Monkeys love peanuts.
      Raub must make more for them!

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    3. Eating & buying chocolates not only stimulate economy... right? ^^

      I thought monkeys like bananas? xD

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    4. What is canggih? Sophisticated?

      I loved reading this dialogue with its lah and mah and kakaka! :D

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    5. You survive in KL anytime Rurousha! ;)

      Canggih does mean sophisticated. Also hi-tech. Modern too. Pandai lah you. ;p

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  12. I do not know. Perhaps he is a chivalrous thief and almost all Japanese people know him.

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  13. Happy Valentine's Day! I hope you receive lots of chocolates. Those Rikisha guys don't have to worry about eating too much with all the exercise they do.

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    1. Happy Valentine's Day AVCr8teur! :)

      Yeah, those guys should burn more than enough calories daily even if they eat like a sumo wrestler! xD

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  14. I believe in Japan, there is an occasion when guys get chocolates. Fair and square.

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    1. Guys get their fill of chocolates today. Gals get them on White Day, which falls next month.

      When it comes to chocolates, I'm not giving any! I want my guy to give to me! LOL

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    2. Anyway, what's the fun in giving out those "giri-choco"?

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    3. I've read that women are getting fed-up with this giri-choco thing too, so they've started giving chocolate to each other instead of to men! Now that I like! ^^

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    4. Good for them, I say!

      I would have fed-up even before I start giving out those chocs. ;)

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  15. What's wrong with chocolates from ladies to men? OK what! but I prefer more than just chocolates lah haha!

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    1. Of course nothing wrong one. But rather than give them to you, I rather eat those chocs myself. LOL

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  16. Oh! What are those funny statues? And that big statue on the wall?

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    1. That's what I'm trying to know. ;)

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  17. The rickshaw folks actually turn me off to the area. Yeah, a ride on a rickshaw is fun sometimes but they can be a bit pushy with their sales pitch. I tell them 'no' and that should be the end of it.

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    1. Good thing they were never pushy to me. I guess they got excited in trying to get you as their customer, no?

      But at least they mainly push their services right at Kaminarimon. Didn't find them chasing local/foreign tourists much elsewhere.

      And pushy sales pitch - there are pushier ones where I come from. Japanese pushy sales got nothing on me! xD

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