Friday, 11 May 2012

Balls Of Rice

I’ve written a post on meal to go and mentioned about onigiri there so this is just a rehash of the previous post(s) for the benefit of current readers. ^^

Onigiri is rice ball. In Malay we’d call it “Nasi Kepal”. How did I learn about the word “Nasi Kepal”? By watching a Malay-dubbed Japanese drama called “Oshin” when I was in primary school. I bet most Malaysians old enough to enjoy long-winded drama series watched Oshin when it was shown on Malaysian TV way back in the 1980s. Whole families would sit around their TVs to watch the episodes together. After Oshin, we were equally transfixed to a Philippine’s serial called “Angelito”. A decade later, it would be Korean drama “Winter Sonata” that got the attention of Malaysian viewers. But I digress. Heh heh

Onigiri is cooked rice (wouldn’t want to eat uncooked rice, would we? But I did.) formed into either a triangular or round shape, wrapped in seaweed and eaten with the hands. Onigiri is documented to be in the diet in ancient times and that they had already been enjoyed by the Japanese people since the middle of the Yayoi era (10th century B.C.- 3rd century A.D.). Eating laver (seaweed) became popular in the 17th century and with that, the beginnings of the onigiri we know today.
Onigiri can be found in all convenience stores and onigiri with special delicious fillings are sold at department stores or specialty shops.
Raimie particularly loves this fried shrimp onigiri. He didn't look happy in this photo simply because he wasn't ready for Mommy's camera yet. ^^

RM2.50 per piece onigiri can be bought at AEON here. Or if you want to try the Korean version; try the trimbap (triangular kimbap). The ones sold at the same AEON in Mid Valley look very, very triangle. Very sharp angles. hihihi

There are many different types of fillings to choose from, ranging from simply pickled Japanese plums to grilled salmon, cod roe, and katsuo-bushi (dried bonito) with soy sauce are the most popular fillings but, recently, new western-influenced fillings such as "tuna and mayonnaise" have become popular. How about Spam-filled onigiri (or known otherwise as Spam musubi)?
Other types of onigiri can be made of rice mixed with pickles, such as takana or yukari instead of plain rice, or made with local specialties such as "onigiri grilled with butter" in Hokkaido and "tenmusu" (shrimp tempura wrapped in rice) in Aichi Prefecture.

Raimie’s Mommy version of onigiri? The fast and almost instant version : Mix rice with furikake or sprinkle it later after you’ve shaped your rice balls. For the filling: cook some canned sardines, mix with mayonnaise (think sardines sandwich) and plonk the filling in the middle of your rice ball. Hold the ball in your palm (this sounds naughty) to shape it or use a mould for the shape. I have a variety of moulds in different shapes & sizes. ^^

Pull out a nori (laver/dried seaweed) and eat it with the rice balls.
Raimie’s Mommy made this for the two boys to eat while waiting for Mommy to finish her night race. ^^ It’s great picnic food.

24 comments:

  1. Wait. Woa. Go back a bit. What do you mean you ate uncooked rice? When? Where? Why? I demand details!

    My favourite onigiri is sekihan onigiri, made with red beans. Me and my sweet tooth! :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not as a meal. It was as remedy for something, tummy ache or whatever. Can't remember, it was ages ago in prehistoric time when I was just a small cute dinosaur. hahaha. I ate unwashed, uncooked dried anchovies too, if you care to know. ;p

      Munched betel leaves like nobody's business at 6 y.o. Me, jungle girl.

      I'm betting you like red bean porridge. ;)

      Delete
    2. Oh, it was one of those jungle remedies that somehow didn't kill us! :D We had dried fish called bokkoms as kids. Bad smell. Ugh.

      Oshiruko? That's better than chocolate! No, really, I could eat that three times a day and still request seconds! ^^

      Delete
    3. Bokkoms sure looks like something we love to eat here. Salted fish a.k.a ikan masin. The smellier the better. Once fried, the whole neighbourhood knows you are eating one! LOL

      Gosh, haven't had one of those in ages.

      Shiruko is bubur kacang merah here. We serve it topped with coconut milk. Yummy! ^^

      Delete
  2. I'm glad to know that most of you have watched Oshin. It was also famous drama in Japan. My parents used to watch it every morning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We watched a lot of foreign serials, we Malaysians. Indonesian cinetrons, Philippines & South Americas telenovelas, Korean dramas, US soaps, etc. I guess we are a bunch of couch potatoes. ;p

      Delete
  3. I love onigiri. Mmmmmmm. I've made them a few times but they never seem to taste as good as ones I buy. I think I'm scared of using as much salt as I need to! Yours look yummy, and I love the box they're in :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can never be able to make one as nice as the bought ones too. And it tends to be a tad dry.

      The box. Bought at a 100-yen shop. In Asakusa. ^^

      Delete
  4. Onigiri is a great Japanese snack or quick eat item, kind of like a sandwich in the west. They are one of the most popular items for a picnic, school lunch or as a fast food item in convenience stores. My favourite fillings are tuna with mayonnaise, salted salmon, and bonito flakes with soy sauce.

    Japan Australia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. reading the comments makes me hungry. LOL

      Delete
  5. I make mine completely plain as I don't normally have time to be creative. My kids still love them. Must try fillings one day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nothing too creative for me either!

      But putting in fillings made it more interesting for the boys to eat it. ^^

      Delete
  6. Melaka also got its own version what -the chicken rice balls! Kakaka!! Tasteless and overrated!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Then, good thing I never went and try it yet. ;p

      Delete
  7. Raimie's first photo is very good. I did not know he liked fried shrimp onigiri.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. oh yes, ebi furai onigiri is his favourite.^^

      Delete
  8. Oh this is called onigiri...as long as it is Jap food...I like. Happy Mother's Day to you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a very simple and down-to-earth Japanese food.

      Happy Mother's Day to you too. :)

      Delete
  9. For such a simple dish, it is very Japanese and often skipped by people visiting Tokyo. I don't blame them as I can't eat it all the time. I do prefer ones that are made fresh, but conbini ones are good too. You should do a post on how to open them up too. The conbini ones are notorious with my friends as they never know how to open it up the very first time. Me too, of course. Even though there are numbers on the wrapper, almost everyone I know just ripped them open and messed it up. (^^)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A post on how to open an onigiri! Yes, someone should do it!

      Though the ones sold at Jusco here in KL do come with instructions (not just numbers) but I think like almost everyone, we messed it up by opening it wrongly ;p

      Delete
  10. Hi Lina, yes yes its been a LONG time since Ive been here eh apalagi update my blog, to cut my story short - its been a hectic time for me from balik kampung to dealing with viral fever and now all is good. Just dropping by to wish you a HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY :) Hope you had a lovely day with your family :) <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh dear, Hope that you are feeling better now.

      I've missed you!

      How's the little princess doing?

      Happy Mother's day to you too! :)

      Delete
  11. Yummi rice balls. ^0^ Almost dinner time now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ate Japanese food for dinner? :)

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...