Monday, 25 June 2012

A Home That Used To Sit 1,000 Metres Above Sea Level

can be found at Shikoku Mura, donated by Eitaro Shimoki. The house's original location was at the highest point of the mountain village of Itchuson Kijiya, 1,000 metres above sea level.
In the entrance-work area are a clay threshing floor and a mortar for hulling wheat and barley. The clay oven  and pot was used for boiling a teburous root to make konnyaku.

Talking about hulling, here's a hut with a water driven mortar for hulling rice. Cool, right?
Such device was still used in Shikoku to hull rice up to the 1950s! By the way, it's a pity that we somehow missed taking photos of the interior (and the mortar inside) of this hut. Ah well...

By the way, have you read my rather rambling posts on a few other exhibits in Shikoku Mura?
A few homes here and here. A place where they made sugar and drink tea here. Paper was made here. The path you can take to walk around the open-air museum here. Lighthouses and the keeper's home here.

18 comments:

  1. Keep them coming please as really enjoy this series. Would love a mountain house one of these days when I retire :)

    Japan Australia

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    1. I would love a mountain house but of course it has to come with all the modern conveniences esp modern plumbing! ;p

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    2. Got to have an onsen at the back for those winter dips in the snow as well :)

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    3. Yeah. Having one of those would be awesome! ;)

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  2. Yeap ^^ keep them coming please!

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    1. Thank you for liking them, JA & Ristinw! :)

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  3. Interesting photoes. Keep posting more and more

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  4. All of them are interesting. 1,000 meters above sea level is unique and the air must be clean.

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  5. How much floor polish do you need for all those wooden floors?!

    These old houses are so beautiful, but phew, I'm glad I don't have to cook in that kitchen! ^^

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    1. What do people use as a polish back in those days? Spit? ;p

      I'm remembering how it was cooking at my late grandma's house using wood stove.

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  6. This whole place looks beautiful and really interesting. And what a lot of work involved in caring for them so well.

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    1. Sure looks like they were cared well despite the house's age. :)

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  7. Good shots... Am bringing some students to visit this place next week...

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    1. I wish I can tag along. The place is so much fun and informative!

      Are they foreign students, Lrong?

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  8. That is an interesting floor which looks like it is made of bamboos? Looks hard to walk on.

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    1. My grandma's house used to have bamboo floors - at the wet kitchen area, when she didn't have modern plumbing yet. It is OK to walk around the floor. Sitting might be iffy, gotta be careful not to get butt lodged betweed the gap of the bamboo but it is cooling to have bamboo floors. And it is great for area that you need to wash/ use water a lot. ^^

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