Friday, 15 June 2012

A Lighthouse And Its Keeper's Home

Found where else? At Shikoku Mura, of course. My fifth instalment of my Shikoku Mura posts. More up soon. I think...

Anyhoo, if you haven't read the previous posts on Shikoku Mura, do click on these links:
Glimpse of common people dwellings
Encounter the traditional face of Japan
Family home of olden time
The trail

OK, now back to the post today.
This is Okunojima Lighthouse (Okunojima todai). Okunojima is a small island, just 4KM in circumference and located just offshore from Takehara City in Hiroshima Prefecture. It was built in 1893 and was first used on May 15, 1894. 

During World War II, Okunojima Island removed all maps of the area for security purposes. It survived the war and continued to be in use until 1992 when it became structurally obsolete.
This was the lighthouse keeper's home.
The interior of the lighthouse keeper's home of Cape Isaki with its Western style furnishing. Lighthouses and lighthouse keepers' houses were built by British architects back then.
There are a number of lighthouse keepers home at Shikoku Mura - from Nabeshima, Cape Esaki and Kudako Island.

The houses are stone built but the interior differ between those which were built at early Meiji period and at later period. The latter is notable for its Japanese style rooms that came with closets.
and what is this? An ofuro?

I did look for the loo (you know I can't resist doing that). Found and used one... of the modern type, with tap water. There's a toilet here up on the hill for those needing a loo break. ahahah

26 comments:

  1. What IS that last photo? A brick bath, with an opening for ... stoking a fire under your butt?!

    I'd love to have the lighthouse keeper's home as a weekend cottage! ^^

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    1. Me think that that's the way you keep a bath heated those days. Unless of course one have legions of servants to keep on pouring hot water. No? xD

      Or water heating done in bulk? Just scoop up pails of it when in need? ;p

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    2. It makes me laugh because it reminds me of the hundreds of cartoons I've seen of bone-through-the-nose jungle savages boiling missionaries in big pots! You can see a few here. :D

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    3. I thought of the same thing too! Refrained from putting it in the post or in the comment. But I should've! ;p

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    4. Oops. Was that an un-PC comment? Oh, never mind, I'm a savage myself, and I have no concept of correct behaviour. ;)

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    5. Have absolutely no clue. I'm quite ignorant about all these PC issues. xD

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  2. Yep, concerning the last pic, it was to keep the bath heated back in the days.

    I love those lighthouse keeper houses, especially the one that's English on the outside, but Japanese on the inside.

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    Replies
    1. Cool! Thanks for the confirmation. So it's a heated bath. :)

      Yup, I like those too. A harmony of East and West? :)

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  3. Love seeing lighthouses and we are lucky here on the Mornington Peninsula to have quite a few good ones to check out. Haven't seen a lot in Japan, but would be keen to have a look :)

    Japan Australia

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    1. Lighthouses are rather a romantic image.

      There are of course nice, historical ones here too, but I've yet made any visit to any of them. Maybe I should. ;p

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  4. Ofuro? Japanese bath tub?

    I thought it was kitchen stove initially, hahaha! My vision no good :p

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    Replies
    1. Like those in old Korean kitchen. Big kuali! hahaha

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  5. I like the architecture of the lighthouses. So old fashioned and have the "English" feels, despite standing strong in Japan :)

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    Replies
    1. and yet, there is Japanese touches here and there. Right? :)

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  6. I like the red chairs. The person who chose them have a good sense.

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    1. Red chairs was rather popular back in those days, with these kind of architecture, no? Seems so as one can find it here in Malaysia too,in old British style official building. ;p

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  7. The little lighthouse is so white! Why people paint it all white?

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    Replies
    1. So that it's easy to locate? ^^

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  8. I have always fancied a lighthouse keeper's house (or a windmill). These days in England they are insanely expensive.

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    Replies
    1. A windmill house. How romantic (and creaky?) ^^

      How expensive are those in England?

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  9. That lighthouse keeper's home is very luxurious. And it looks like they boarded up the ofuro so you could not try it. ;)

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    Replies
    1. It would be fun to sit in it!

      But I didn't even try to open it up. LOL

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  10. Nice shots. You like such kind of old building. I thought that light tower is better than lighthouse. But I was told by a native speaker that people lived in a lighthouse in a few decades ago. So lighthouse is correct.

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    Replies
    1. Old buildings have history behind it and knowing the story makes it much more special. ^^

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  11. I love old buildings, there's so much history and life behind it. I just love how they kept this lighthouse in good condition, must've put so much work to maintaining this. Anchor's awayyyy eh wait your lil boy is still there sitting on it :)

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, love old buildings and the stories behind them. ^^

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