Thursday, 5 July 2012

A Fisherman Abode

I feel like I'm toying with the cosmic order posting about this particular exhibit out of order. Ahahah... After all, this exhibit is located right at the end of the trail one need to walk through at Shikoku Mura. Anyway, here's a fisherman's home for you!
A fisherman's house facing the Pacific should be sturdy and this house has a stone fence on the sea side serves as a windbreak and the narrow entryway is to minimise and keep out rain and wind.

This dwelling was in an isolated fishing village strung along the base of a cliff in the Izari region of Tokushima prefecture.
 Son making himself comfy while Mommy checking out the place.

Functioning to provide complete shelter in the frequently foul weather the area faced, the house has a low roof to reduce wind resistance and is covered with heavy tiles (hongawara).
The baked clay entrance and adjacent bamboo floors are designed for the return of the fisherman; dripping wet in their fishing gears.

The central or "Good Fortune Pillar" (daikoku bashira) is unusually massive. All lumber throughout the house was handshaped by adze.
The waters of Izari were once filled with yellowtails (buri) which is a much favoured eating fish. 

A sad reason for this house came to Shikoku Mura in its original condition was because the villagers had no funds to renovate their houses. The villagers in the community decided to increase their catch by buying a huge net like in commercial fisheries. After the net was bought, the yellowtail left the feeding ground of Izari and moved elsewhere. The villagers were saddled with huge debts that they could not pay off and the town went bankrupt leaving fishermen without funds to renovate their houses.

18 comments:

  1. Interesting fisherman's home! Too bad the villagers do not have enough funds.

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    1. Yeah, too bad about their financial situation.

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  2. Thank you thank you thank you for my fisherman's house story! Which, please note, I got through a combination of patience and relentless nagging. :D

    "The return of the fisherman; dripping wet in their fishing gear ... " Yes. I can confirm that. Ever seen a car with a dripping wet fisherman as occupant? It's a scary sight.

    That last paragraph contains such an important wisdom. Bigger is not always better, "progress" is not always a good idea, copycatting (copyfishing?) others should not be done blindly. These fishermen didn't tap on the stone bridge, did they?

    Thanks for this story, Lina! Fascinating to see how the house was adjusted for the weather and the purpose it served. Happy! Very. I'll stop nagging now. ^^

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    1. I never know you can combine a mention of patience and nagging in one sentence. LOL

      Dripping fisherman in their gears. Do you know what is an equally scary sight? Dripping wet runner. Sweat & body odour. What a heady combo. My husband is a saint for putting up with it. Hehehe

      The villagers - I guess what they did was akin to killing the goose that laid the golden egg. :(

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    2. Patience + nagging = perfect way to deal with jungle women. Or Japanese men. :-p

      Dripping wet runner? That made me chuckle. How about dripping wet fisherman plus loyal supporter who's super-sweaty after dutifully following her feudal lord over many mountains in the midst of summer, both in one car? It's a wonder we haven't been kicked out of hotels yet. We're not a pretty sight when we arrive.

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    3. I can only imagine the sight you two made. ;p

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  3. Looks like a sturdy and solid house to survive the conditions that it would have faced on the coast.

    Japan Australia

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  4. I love this house. I think it's my favorite in Shikoku Mura. thanks for posting. :-)

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    1. Me too. I feel like the occupants never left.

      I love Shikoku Mura and its my pleasure to share what little info I have with everyone who drops by this blog. ^^

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  5. recently, there are some sites which you can gather money for making society better. I hope that shikoku mura will use it.
    Japanese version
    https://readyfor.jp/

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    1. Shikoku Mura and other places too!

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  6. It is sad to hear about the village. Fishing and farming are difficult occupations. As for the house, it sounds like it was built perfectly to withstand the weather and returning fishermen.

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    1. I agree with you about both being difficult occupations and I am so grateful there are those who are doing it!

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  7. I love the way the old building has been preserved.

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    1. Me too. That's why it was particularly nice to visit Shikoku Mura. :)

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  8. Houses built in the past look more steady than the houses built in the present. I like it.

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    1. That's why old houses can pretty much still stand strong even now, right? :)

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