Monday, 23 July 2012

Instructions Needed

I remember there was this time a few years back, when me and a few of my colleagues went to (the now closed) Ninja Jones Izakaya and they all went ga-ga over the high tech imported Japanese toilets that were installed in the restaurant.

But a few girls came to me and whispered that they had no idea how to use the toilet! One even said she didn't flush!
That was many years back. I bet now we all are used to these kind of toilets already. But just in case there are those who are unsure, a simple instruction is plenty useful!

26 comments:

  1. I like hi-tech toilets! LOL!

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  2. But Malaysia hard to find such toilets right? Unless in some 5 star hotels some where? : D

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    1. Cannot put for mass usage because we Malaysian will vandalise it! hu~

      Normal toilet also cannot tahan...

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  3. They were all the rage when I first went over to Japan but you soon get over them and they don't seem as special anymore. My in-laws even have one in their bathroom at home :)

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    1. True.

      But I still love those toilets in Japan! :)

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  4. Due to the energy situation (shutdowns of the nuclear plants) the trend now may be back to the basics... no?

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    1. No it won't. It's too cold in the winter to NOT have one. They are well heated and when the bathroom isn't heated, you will be really happy to have one.

      Plus, once you sit on one and enjoy it, you never go back.

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    2. Lrong & Dru,
      It's good to go back to basics but yes... after experiencing a warm seat for my butt, I will never go back!

      Unless it's squat toilet. Now that, I call back to basics. Last time in kampung, no flushing system - just pour a pail of water into the "hole" Flushing done. ;p

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  5. Yes, simple is best. I don't use bidet even if the toilet has it.

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    Replies
    1. I use them. I need it. We muslims need to clean with water.

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  6. This made me grin. I could always cope with toilet instructions - they're simple enough - but I remember my first Japanese washing machine, and my first Japanese microwave oven, and my first Japanese computer. Oh boy. Was I ever stupid! :D

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    1. You just reminded me of my firsts with Japanese stuff. It took 5 years before I got a Japanese computer. Now I don't mind it but it is frustrating when I want to type using a regular American keyboard. "Shift-7" is no longer apostrophe. Although the washing machine, microwave, and rice cooker are still mysteries to me. I can only do the basics. No bread baking with the rice cooker for me. :(

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    2. I still have a long way to go with Japanese appliances. I guess I need to have more exposure? (Read : more visits to Japan) kakaka

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    3. I learned by randomly pushing buttons and watching the results.

      Actually, that's how I learned about everything in Japan. I call it the Nike approach: just do it and see what happens. I've tried it with The Hero as well. Sometimes successful, sometimes not. :D

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    4. Dru, I prefer Western keyboards. A Japanese keyboard's space bar is too small, and surrounded by too many esoteric kanji-related buttons. I keep hitting everything except the space bar.

      I love making blueberry muffins in my rice cooker. Just one problem: the next batch of rice tastes like blueberries! :D

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    5. The one time I did push buttons randomly, some dude popped out of the wall at me. Note that this was in the train station at the ticket machines. Nearly jumped a metre back. :D

      I like western keyboards but when I needed a new computer, I had no choice. I got used to it. I am borrowing the Saviour's computer as mine is in the shop and the backspace key is tiny! I keep hitting 7777 to backspace, or \\\. I got used to my computer though.

      Blueberry rice... sounds interesting. And how do you make muffins in a rice cooker? Sounds like you'd just make one big muffin. ;)

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    6. Dru, we're hijacking Lina's post! :D You can buy English computers (Eng OS, Eng keyboard, Eng everything) in Akihabara! They're not necessarily more expensive than Japanese ones, either.

      Yes, it's a one giant blueberry muffin/cake, but because it's made in a rice cooker, it's really moist and really nice. The secret is to chuck lots of baking powder into the mix. That makes it fluffy.

      Hmm. What would happen if you added baking powder to rice?! :p

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    7. It's fun to hijack. ;) Sorry Lina.

      I know I can buy it in Akiba but I want a Japanese keyboard. Easier to switch between Japanese and English. I also got used to the keyboard pretty quickly.

      MMMmmmm. Blueberry muke... make? Muffke? ;)

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    8. Hijack away!

      I'm learning lots by all this hijacking done. ;)

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  7. This reminds me of a story a co-worker of mine had. He went in to a department store to use the loo. He did a number 2 and when he was done, he pushed a button for what he thought was the washlet. Instead it was the emergency call button and a siren went off. Needless to say, he wiped very quickly and ran out the stall.

    A few years later, his mother would do the exact same thing. ^^

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    1. That is so funny!

      I have this bad habit of pushing all the buttons just to try them and see what they do... lucky for me, none of it was a siren! ;p

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  8. Lucky you and me too. I never had a siren go off either. I usually avoid pressing big red buttons but in Japan it is often used to stop a machine from continuing. There are always funny stories about people using Japanese bidets and the trouble they get into. Some I can't tell because the others will kill me!

    On a cool note, I did see a toilet with an LED light shining into the bowl. It was PIMP. ;)

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    1. Can't you just whisper the stories to me? ;p

      LED light in toilet bowl - wow!

      But why? To scare all the lurking ghosts in toilets. ;p

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    2. A whisper on the internet goes everywhere. :P

      The light was to help men aim and women, sometimes men, find the bowl. The room was a little dark. You can see it here: http://twitpic.com/abwx0w

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  9. Toilets in Japan can be intimidating. Pressing a button could mean flushing the toilet or giving your bottom a shower.

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    Replies
    1. True.

      Press at your own peril! haha

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