Sunday, 1 July 2012

A Master's Home and A Place Where The Elders Can Retire

I've been going on and on about the exhibits in Shikoku Mura, haven't I? Bear with me. I just find them very interesting and felt it's a pity if I can't find a reason to put each of them in a post here.
A residence of Master Kume Tsuken, an intellect, inventor and entreprenuer which was built in the late 18th century. In his life, Master Kume helped develop the growth of salt making in Sakaide where his house was located. He also invented naval cannon, pistols and an air-circulating fan. 

When the house was disassembled for its move to Shikoku Mura, various navigational instruments and molds for casting cannons were found  in the attic. Interesting, eh?
Two homes and a work storage belonging to the Nakaishi family was the next exhibit that we saw. These buildings, like many of the exhibits in Shikoku Mura; came from Ochiudo Mura, a refuge village originally established by survivors of the vanquished Heike clan in the late 12th century. 

It was long a custom in the region to build  a smaller, extra house as a retirement retreat for family elders and this was the etiquette of the Nakaishi Family.

The houses are arranged side by side on a space saving narrow terrace just like it was in the mountains except for the fact that the ones in the mountains would have the back of the houses right against the slope.

Coming up next - an official storehouse, a granary, an arched bridge, a stone storehouse, a border guardhouse and lastly a fisherman's house. Not too long before I wrap up my lenghty posts on Shikoku Mura and move on to our visit to a really beatiful garden - the Ritsurin Koen.

22 comments:

  1. Great post as usual Lina.
    You're the best promoter of Shikoku Mura I have seen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks!

      It's a great place to visit and learn a bit about Shikoku's (if not Japan) history. ^^

      Delete
  2. Love it Lina, Yes, you should work for the local tourism authority all the promotion you have done. keep them coming :)

    Japan Australia

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    Replies
    1. :)

      Where do I apply for the job? ;p

      Delete
  3. So peaceful surroundings, really the best place for retirement! ^^

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  4. Do you like tatami(畳)? It's a cozy space. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do. Anyway, sitting in space like that isn't foreign for us all over Asia, right?

      Malays have our own kind of floor covering too, but it's not popular anymore - it's called the tikar mengkuang. ;)

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    2. So of course I ... you know what I did ... I did a Google Images search for tikar mengkuang. Ooo. Nice. Cool, colourful, interesting patterns! ^^

      Delete
  5. The best part about this house (for me) is that inner courtyard in the third photo. That's probably what I love most about old Japanese houses - that seamless flow from house to garden.

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    Replies
    1. I'm rather partial to "hanok" too.

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    2. Hanok is nice, too, but ... you'll forgive me my bias for all things Japanese? ;)

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  6. A FISHERMAN'S HOUSE?! When?! Whenwhenwhen? :D

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    Replies
    1. Fishermen and their partners should know the virtue of being patient. No?

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  7. Fish! Tomorrow?

    >°))))彡

    :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. definitely not.

      I do not want to disturb the order of the exhibits! Patience woman patience!

      For once, follow African time! LOL

      Delete
    2. By the way, when are you updating that blog(s) of yours?

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    3. This summer has been fairly busy at work, i.e. less time for walking and writing. I think July will be equally busy.

      Oy! Practice what you preach! Patience! :-p

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    4. You don't need to walk. I bet there are thousands (if not millions) of photos in yoiur archive waiting to be posted.

      oh wait! New post! bababi!

      Delete
  8. They really take care of their elders and make sure they live close by. The attic doesn't look big enough for a place to make canons.

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    Replies
    1. I guess it's an Asian thing - filial piety is big for us. ;)

      I agree. I guess the molds for the cannons were in parts hence not needing more space?

      Delete

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