Saturday, 28 July 2012

The Crescent Moon Bridge

or Engetsukyo Bridge at the lovely Ritsurin Koen.
The view from the highest point in the garden; Hirahao. From this point, one can see Mount Shiun in the background with Nan-ko( Southern Lake), the crescent moon bridge and also the three man-made lakes in the foreground. If you squint enough, you can see the Kikugetsu-tei summer villa which is now a teahouse.
One for the family album!

By the way, here's a cropped photo of the statue I asked for more info in my previous post. Dru, David & Ru : onegai shimasu! ^^
 Psssttt... it can be enlarged. ^^

21 comments:

  1. That bridge is a favourite spot for picture taking.... good souvenir family shot...

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    1. There was a guy there patiently snapping photos and he nicely offered to take our photos. :)

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  2. The bridge is so pretty! ^.^ And I like the pines around it too.

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    1. Hi you! Thanks for dropping by. :)

      There are a whole lot of pines there and I have a post specifically on the pines up sometime in the future. I think... ;p

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  3. Nice family portrait at such a beautiful place. Having lunch at the teahouse must be spectacular.

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    1. I bet it is. And more awesome if we get to do a bit of moon viewing from there! :)

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  4. The Crescent Moon bridge is a beautiful spot for a picture and love the surrounds :)

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  5. So, the man on the statue is Matsudaira Yorinaga, who is the son of the last Daimyo of Takamatsu.
    Why is he/it there, I'm not sure.
    My first thought was that he is the one who gave Ritsurin to the city of Takamatsu (as it was property and residence of the Matsudaira before that), but he was only one year old when it happened. And Ritsurin was not exactly "given" it was seized by the Meiji administration when the Matsudaira were stripped of their power for having rebelled against Meiji.
    If anyone can read Japanese here, here is the link to his wikipedia page: http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%9D%BE%E5%B9%B3%E9%A0%BC%E5%AF%BF

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  6. aiyooo..... so beautiful! I want to go visit!!

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  7. I think I remember reading that Hirahao was also called the Mt. Fuji of Ritsurin Koen. I forgot where I read that though. Probably in the park... ^^

    Also of note, Japan has a lot of "Mt. Fujis". Everywhere you can find a temple/shrine with their own mini Mt. Fuji and other areas call their mountains Mt. Fuji if it is even slightly similar. I remember Mt. Daisen in Tottori is called the Mt. Fuji of the Sea of Japan.

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    1. Such reverence to the sacred mountain! I suppose it's because it's one of the holy mountains

      Interesting fact. I'll definitely look up for mini Mount Fujis for my next visit. :)

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  8. David got in first. I was too busy toyi-toying. ;-)

    Love the family album shot!

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    1. Don't toyi-toyi too much! ;p

      Thanks. One of those rare family photo we had in our collection. ;)

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  9. Weiiiii!! I am so shocked to see you here! You got so many blogs ka? Wah dashyat la you!! More hardworking than SK Thambee!

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  10. I like Japan posts! I will add this to my blog roll so that I know where to visit next year.

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    1. Walau eh! How can TM sesat here one ah?

      Wah, today really must go buy 4D. But eh... 4D at Jalan Bangsar close on Tuesday! Oooppsss... later TM will ask me how I know the closing day of a Toto shop pulak! muahaha

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  11. I love the scenery. Such a wonderful place to relax. ^0^

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    1. It sure is. I wouldn't mind spending hours there, sitting quietly. :)

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